When a relative doesn’t “get it” that a loved one has dementia

Are you enjoying my blog posts? Grab a free download of one chapter from my audiobook here and also receive any future helpful tips and posts right to your inbox! Let’s pretend you have four siblings. You and three of your siblings understand that mom has dementia. You get it: you have been changing theContinue reading “When a relative doesn’t “get it” that a loved one has dementia”

“Her memory is terrible, but she doesn’t have dementia” and other statements by people in denial

“Well, mom probably forgot to call you back. I told her to do it, but her memory is just terrible,” Megan’s daughter said. “She doesn’t have dementia, though.” What! Of COURSE mom has dementia. This was later confirmed when I met Megan and found that, indeed, her memory and decision-making skills were quite lacking. She wasContinue reading ““Her memory is terrible, but she doesn’t have dementia” and other statements by people in denial”

“My [insert loved one here] isn’t like these people.”

“She doesn’t need to move to a care community yet.” “He’s not like these people.” “Her memory isn’t that bad.” “He only got lost the one time.” If you’re telling yourself these things, it’s probably time to move your loved one to a care community. Here’s the bottom line: your loved one cannot make a safe decisionContinue reading ““My [insert loved one here] isn’t like these people.””

What’s the right time to ask for help if you’re an Alzheimer’s caregiver?

A guest post by Zara Lewis In my wonderful family, we all love and support each other; however, as it often happens, most of the important tasks are entrusted to a woman, in this case – me. My mother-in-law is at the end-stage of Alzheimer’s and I’ve been caring for her (with just a littleContinue reading “What’s the right time to ask for help if you’re an Alzheimer’s caregiver?”

I’m going home now.

Many of our residents receive visitors on a regular basis. It’s nice to see them interact with daughters, sons, grandchildren, and even spouses. The trouble occurs when family members don’t know how to say goodbye when the visit ends. I’ve watched numerous family members (especially spouses) say to their loved one, “Okay, I’m going home.”Continue reading “I’m going home now.”

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