HOW TO talk to strangers about your loved one’s condition

“I wish I could take her out to lunch more often,” he sighed. “I’m just really worried that she’s going to say or do something inappropriate. One time, for example, we were in the checkout line at the grocery store and she started loudly talking about the woman in front of us. It was so embarrassing.Continue reading “HOW TO talk to strangers about your loved one’s condition”

You’re probably grieving, but don’t realize it

*Content warning: this is probably a tear-jerker, just because we’re talking about grief and loss. When I started working in this field, I recognized that I’d be dealing with a lot of death and dying, and, therefore, grief. I wrongfully assumed that the only challenging part of the job would come into play when someoneContinue reading “You’re probably grieving, but don’t realize it”

Don’t ask someone with dementia if they “know your name” or “remember you”

If I can, I always opt to ditch my name tag in a dementia care environment. I let my friends with dementia decide what my name is: I’ve been Susan, Gwendolyn, and various peoples’ kids. I’ve been so many identities to my residents, too: a coworker, a boss, a student, a sibling, a friend fromContinue reading “Don’t ask someone with dementia if they “know your name” or “remember you””

Fear & Dementia

I received an interesting email from a woman who follows my blog posts. She wrote,  “There is one thing I have not found much information about that I am hoping you might address in a future blog [post]: fear. Not fear of Alzheimer’s, or abandonment, or even dying. My husband has started to fret aboutContinue reading “Fear & Dementia”

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